New York - Fast Facts & Trivia

A view of the American, Bridal Veil and Horseshoe Falls from the Presidential Suite of the Sheraton Fallsview Hotel, Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada.

  • The Genesee River is one of the few rivers in the world that flows from south to north.

  • Rochester is known as both Flour City and Flower City. The community is home to the first group of abolitionists, bloomers, marshmallows, Jell-O, French mustard, baby shoes, gold teeth, and the mail chute.

  • Gennaro Lombardi opened in 1895 in New York City, the first American pizzeria.

  • On July 28, 1945, an Army Air Corps B-25 crashed into the Empire State Building on the 79th floor.

  • New York's largest lake in Oneida measures 79.8 square miles.

  • New York's highest waterfall is the 215-foot Taughannock.

  • The Erie Canal, built throughout New York in the 1820s, opened the Midwest for development and helped New York City become a global trading hub.

  • The first Boy's Club was founded in 1876 in New York.

  • European settlers who brought seeds to New York introduced apples in the 17th century.

  • The Big Apple is a musician-driven term that plays the big time.

  • The first Eagle Scout was Arthur R. Eldred of Troop 1 at Oceanside. He was awarded the honor in May 1912.

  • The Ten Mile River Boy Scout Camp in Narrowsburg is the country's largest municipal camp.

  • Joseph C. Gayetty of New York City invented toilet paper in 1857.

  • Wade Boggs and Cal Ripken Jr. played in Rochester. Pawtucket Red Sox in the longest game in baseball history against each other. The game went a total of 33 innings.

  • The oldest cattle farm in the US was founded in 1747 in Montauk on Long Island.

  • Adirondack Park is bigger than Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Glacier and Olympic Parks together.

  • New York was the first state to require license plates.

  • Niagara Reservation became the first state park in the United States.

  • The historic site of Washington's Newburgh headquarters was the first public historic site.

  • In the state of New York live 58 species of wild orchids.

  • New York has over 70,000 miles of rivers and streams.

  • The first public brewery in America was founded by Peter Minuit in the market (Marckvelt) in Lower Manhattan.

  • The landmark of Mount Kisco, a statue of Chief Kisco, was once an elaborate fountain for watering horses. The statue stands at the intersection of Routes 117 and 133. D.F. Gorham, a strong proponent of Prohibition, presented it to Mount Kisco in 1907. The inscription on the pedestal of the statue reads "God's only drink for humans and animals".

  • The name Canandaigua (pronounced Can-an-DAY-gwa) is derived from an Indian word that means the chosen place.

  • Horseheads is the first and only village in the United States dedicated to serving the American military horse.

  • The first American chess tournament took place in 1843 in New York.

  • The 641-mile transportation network, known as Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway, is the longest toll road in the United States.

  • A brewer named Matthew Vassar founded Vassar College in Poughkeepsie in 1861.

  • In 1979, Vassar students were the first students from a private university to study in the People's Republic of China.

  • Manhattan's Fashion Institute of Technology is the only school in the world to offer a Bachelor of Science degree in cosmetics and fragrance marketing.

  • Union College in Schenectady is considered the mother of the Fraternity, as Delta Phi is the oldest continuously operating fraternity and Kappa Alpha and Sigma Phi Societies have been established on campus.

  • The Woodstock Music and Arts Fair was actually held in Bethel.

  • Dairying is New York's premier agricultural activity, with over 18,000 cattle and / or calf farms.

  • In 1807, the Clermont made its maiden voyage from New York City to Albany, making the ship the first successful steamer.

  • Sam Schapiro started the Kosher wine industry on New York's Lower East Side in 1899 with her famous extra heavy Original Concord wine.

  • New York City has 722 miles of subway lane.

  • The Power Mill Park outside of Rochester has a house on Park Road shaped like a group of mushrooms.

  • Chittenago is home to L. Frank Baum, author of The Wizard of Oz. It has yellow brick paved sidewalks leading to Aunt Ems and other Oz-themed shops. Chittenago is the site of an annual Munchkins parade.

  • Oneida has the smallest church in the world measuring 3.5 'X 6'.

  • The first Yiddish newspaper appeared in 1885 in New York City.

  • The first international sports hero, the boxer Bill Richmond from Staten Island, was born on 5 August 1763.

  • Founded in 1803 by Alexander Hamilton, the New York Post is the oldest running newspaper in the United States.

  • John Babcock invented both the rowing machine and the sliding seat in the winter of 1869/1870.

  • The first railway line in America ran a distance of 11 miles between Albany and Schenectady.

  • The first capital of the United States was New York City. In 1789, George Washington took his oath as president on the balcony of the Federal Hall.

  • In Hartsdale there is an animal cemetery, which was founded in 1896 and contains 12,000 properties.

  • In November, for Boy Scouts and March for Girl Scouts, the annual Urban Camp-Outs are hosted in the Empire State Building.

  • The Catskills are home to the legend of Rip Van Winkle, brown trout and flycasting.

  • The first presentation of 3D films in front of a paying audience took place on June 10, 1915 at the Manhattan Astor Theater.

  • Sam Wilson, a Troy meat-packer whose caricature Uncle Sam became the personification of the United States, is buried at Troy's Oakwood Cemetery. During the War of 1812, he stamped "US Beef" on his products, which soldiers interpreted the US abbreviation as meaning of Uncle Sam.

New York Fast Facts & Trivia . New York Fast Facts & Trivia