Kentucky - Fast Facts & Trivia

A barge hauling coal in the Louisville and Portland Canal, the only manmade section of the Ohio River.

  • Pikeville annually leads the nation in per capita consumption of Pepsi-Cola.

  • The first American performance of a Beethoven symphony took place in 1817 in Lexington.

  • Post-It Notes are made exclusively in Cynthiana. The exact number of these popular grades per year is a trade secret.

  • Kentucky was the 15th state to join the Union and the first on the Western border.

  • Bluegrass is not really blue - its green - but in the spring bluegrass produces bluish-purple buds that, when seen in large fields, give a blue imprint on the grass. Today, Kentucky is known as Bluegrass State.

  • There is a legend that is the inspiration for Stephen Foster's hymn song "My Old Kentucky Home" was written in 1852 after an unconfirmed trip to relatives in Kentucky.

  • Daniel Boone and his wife Rebecca are buried in the Frankfurt cemetery. Her son Isaac is buried at Blue Licks Battlefield near Carlisle, where he was killed in the last battle of the Revolutionary War in Kentucky.

  • The only monument south of the Ohio River, dedicated to the fallen in the Civil War Union Soldiers, located in Vanceburg.

  • The public saw for the first time in Louisville an electric light. In 1883, at the Southern Exposition, Thomas Edison introduced his light bulb to the crowds.

  • The radio was invented in 1892 by a Kentuckian named Nathan B. Stubblefield of Murray. It took three years for Marconi to claim his invention.

  • The first enamel bathtub was made in 1856 in Louisville.

  • In the War of 1812, more than half of all Americans killed in action were Kentuckians.

  • Middlesboro is the only city in the United States built in a meteorite crater.

  • Joe Bowen holds the world record for Stelzwalking endurance. He walked 3,008 miles on stilts between Bowen, Kentucky to Los Angeles, California.

  • The world's largest free-swinging bell, known as the World Peace Bell, is on permanent display in Newport.

  • High Bridge near Nicholasville is the highest railway bridge over navigable water in the United States.

  • Carrie Nation's spokesperson for rum, tobacco, pornography and corsets was born near Lancaster in Garrard County.

  • The brass plate, which is embedded on the sidewalk on the corner of Limestone and Main Street in downtown Lexington, is a memorial dedicated to Smiley Pete. The animal was known in Lexington as a city dog. He died in 1957.

  • Kentucky-born Walter W. Barkley was the United States' oldest vice president when he took office in 1949. He was 71 years old.

  • Fort Knox underground vaults store over $ 6 billion worth of gold. This is the largest amount of gold stored anywhere in the world.

  • The Cathedral of the Assumption in Covington has 82 glass windows, including the largest mouth-blown in the world. The window measures 24 feet wide and 67 feet high and shows the advice of Ephesus with 134 life-size figures.

  • The Lost River Cave and Valley Bowling Green comprise a cave with the shortest and deepest underground river in the world. It contains the largest cave east of the Mississippi.

  • The swimsuit that Mark Spitz wore at the 1972 Olympics was made in Paris, Kentucky.

  • Frederick Vinson, who was born in Louisa, is the only Supreme Judge of the United States Supreme Court who is known to have been born in prison.

  • Pike County, the world's largest coal producer, is famous for the Hatfield-McCoy feud, an Appalachian revenge that lasted from the Civil War until the 1890s

  • The city of Murray is home to the Scouting Museum, which is located on the campus of Murray State University.

  • The Kentucky Derby is the country's oldest uninterrupted horse race. It takes place on the first Saturday in May at Churchill Downs in Louisville.

  • The Bluegrass Country at Lexington is home to some of the best race horses in the world.

  • Kentucky was a favorite hunting ground for the Indians of Shawnee and Cherokee before it was settled by white settlers.

  • In 1774 Harrodstown (now Harrodsburg) was founded as the first permanent settlement in the Kentucky region. It was named after James Harrod, who led a team of surveyors.

  • The old official state tree was the Kentucky coffee tree (Gymnocladus dioicus). The tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) is the current official state tree. The change was made in 1976.

  • Cheeseburgers were first served at the Kaolin restaurant in Louisville in 1934.

  • Chevrolet Corvettes are made in Bowling Green.

  • The Mammoth Cave is the longest cave in the world and was first advertised in 1816. This makes it the second oldest tourist attraction in the United States. Niagara Falls, New York is first.

  • Started in 1819, the first commercial oil well was on the Cumberland River in McCreary County.

  • The first Miss America from Kentucky is Heather Renee French. She was crowned on September 18, 1999.

  • The first Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant owned and operated by Colonel Sanders is located in Corbin.

  • Kentucky is the state where Abraham Lincoln, president of the Union, and Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederation, were born. They were born less than a hundred miles and a year apart.

  • Cumberland is the only waterfall in the world that regularly shows a moon arc. It is just southwest of Corbin.

  • Fleming County is known as the Covered Capital of Kentucky.

  • Shelby County is recognized as Saddlebred Capital of Kentucky.

  • The city of Corbin was the birthplace of old-time Arthur Lake, whose real name was Silverlake: he played the role of Dagwood in the "Blondie" movies of the 1930s and 1940s. Lakes parents were trapeze artists who were referred to as The Flying Silverlakes.

  • Christian County is wet while Bourbon County is dry. Barren County has the most fertile land in the state.

  • Thunder Over Louisville is the opening ceremony for the Kentucky Derby Festival and is the largest fireworks display in the world.

  • More than 100 native Kentuckians were elected governors of other states.

  • In 1888, "Honest Dick" Tate the state treasurer embezzled $ 247,000 and fled the state.

  • The song "Happy Birthday to You" was the creation of two Louisville sisters in 1893.

  • The teacher Mary S. Wilson held in 1887 for the first time on Mother's Day in Henderson. In 1916 it was declared a national holiday.

  • The Big Man o 'War won all his horse races except one he lost to a horse named Upset.

  • The first city in the United States named after the first president was Washington. It was named in 1780.

Kentucky Fast Facts & Trivia . Kentucky Fast Facts & Trivia