Arizona Fast Facts & Trivia

Fountain and terrace, with dining and dormitory area beyond, Taliesin West which was architect Frank Lloyd Wright's winter home and school in the desert from 1937 until his death in 1959

which was

  • The rainfall throughtout the state varies. At Flagstaff, the annual average is 18.31 inches; Phoenix averages 7.64 inches; and Yuma's annual average is 3.27 inches.

  • Cultures contain 2%; Pasture 57%; Forests 24%; and other uses are 17% in the land use designation.

  • The Arizona Rattlesnake is perhaps the finest of all eleven species of rattlesnake in Arizona.

  • The colors blue and gold are the official national colors.

  • In Fountain Hills is a fountain that is considered the highest in the world.

  • Four Corners is considered the place in the United States where one person can stand in four states at the same time.

  • The age of a Saguaro cactus is determined by its height.

  • The Apache trout is considered a threatened species within the framework of the Federal law on endangered species.

  • Arizona, under all states, has reserved the largest percentage of its land and has been called the Indian Land.

  • Mount Humphreys north of Flagstaff is the state's highest mountain.

  • The Hopi Indians of Arizona are known for growing their colorful corn.

  • Barry Goldwater, a famous civil servant, senator and presidential candidate, was born in Phoenix.

  • In 1939, the studio of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, Taliesin West, was built near Phoenix.

  • Oraibi is the oldest Indian settlement in the United States. The Hopis Indians founded it.

  • Grand Canyon's Flaming Gorge gets its name because of its bright red and orange walls, twelve hundred meters high.

  • The catastrophic events of the Grand Canyon were named to commemorate a former research vessel.

  • The Marble Canyon of the Grand Canyon was named after its thousand-foot-thick layer of marble and its walls eroded into a polished glass surface.

  • Arizona became the 48th state on February 14, 1912.

  • The world's largest solar telescope is located at Kitts Peak National Observatory in the town of Sells.

  • At one time, camels were used to transport goods across Arizona.

  • Between the years 1692 and 1711, Father Eusebio Kino focused on missionary work in the area. During this time, many grain and livestock farms started.

  • A person from Arizona is called Arizonan.

  • Phoenix was built in 1866 as a hay camp to supply Camp McDowell.

  • The famous trade union leader Ceasar Estrada Chavez was born in Yuma.

  • Tombstone, Ruby, Gillette and Gunsight are among the ghost towns across the state

  • Arizona is a right to work state. The law states that no one may be given the opportunity to obtain or retain employment because he is not a member of a work organization.

  • The Arizona trout is found only in Arizona.

  • The saguaro cactus flower is the official state flower. The white flower blooms in May and June on the tips of the Saguaro cactus. The Saguaro is the largest American cactus.

  • Arizona leads the nation in copper production.

  • Petrified wood is the official state fossil. Most petrified wood comes from the Petrified Forest in northeastern Arizona.

  • The Bola tie is the official scarf.

  • The Palo Verde is the official state tree. Its name means green rod and it blooms in April or May a shiny yellow gold.

  • The cactus Wren is the official state bird. It grows seven to eight inches long and likes to build nests to protect thorny desert plants like the arms of the giant saguaro cactus.

  • Turquoise is the official gem of the state. The blue-green stone has a slightly waxy surface and can be found throughout the state.

  • Arizona is home to the Grand Canyon National Park.

  • The ring tail is the official state mammal. The Ring-tail is a small fox-like animal about two and a half feet in length and is a shy nocturnal creature.

  • The amount of copper on the roof of the Capitol building is equivalent to 4,100%, 000 pennies.

  • Arizona observes the mountain standard time on an annual basis. The only exception is the Navajo Nation, which is located in the northeast corner of the state and observes the summer time changeover.

  • The battleship USS Arizona was named in honor of the state. It was commissioned in 1913 and launched in 1915 by the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

  • World War II encouraged many military personnel to train in the fields of Luke and Thunderbird in Glendale.

  • The Castilian and Burgundian flags of Spain, the Mexican flag, the Confederate flag and the flag of the United States have all flown over the land area that has become Arizona.

  • In 1926, the Southern Pacific Railroad joined Arizona with the eastern states.

  • The geographic center of Arizona is 55 miles (89 kilometers) southeast of Prescott.

  • The most abundant mineral in Arizona is copper.

  • Bisbee, located in Tombstone Canyon, is known as the queen of copper mines. During its mining history, the city was the largest city between St. Louis and San Francisco.

  • The most popular natural wonders of the state include the Grand Canyon, the Havasu Canyon, the Grand Canyon Caves, the Lake Powell / Rainbow Bridge, the Petrified Forest / Painted Desert, Monument Valley, the Sunset Crater, the Meteor Crater, the Sedona Oak Creek Canyon, the Salt River Canyon and the Superstition Mountains, Picacho Peak State Park, Saguaro National Park, Chiricahua National Monument and the Colorado River.

  • The Arizona tree frog is the official amphibian of the state. The frog is actually between three-quarters to two inches long.

  • Formerly a harsh copper mining town, Jerome's population sank to 50 in 1953 after the mines closed.

  • The original London Bridge was shipped stone by stone and reconstructed in Lake Havasu City.

  • The capital of the Navajo Reserve is the Window Rock.

Arizona Fast Facts & Trivia . Arizona Fast Facts & Trivia