Former Centromart - Now a Church 2222 Lever Blvd - Ron Chapman photo

Historic Stockton Grocers


Stockton Grocers of the Past


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I have created a series of pages covering the streets of Stockton. Scroll down the page or click on a link at the top to see another page. These pages grew put of my love for both architecture and photography. The old photos came from various sources such as The California Photo Library, Calisphere, Library of Congress, UOP Archives, USC Library. OAC Library, friends Facebook and many others. I literally photographed thousands of photos of Stockton buildings. I continue to photograph Stockton on an ongoing basis.

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When the pioneers began moving to the vacant western United States, these self-reliant, independent individuals relied on their own skills to obtain food.

Vegetables could be grown on their homestead and cattle, pigs and chickens could be grown for meat with an occasional deer or bear to supplement their larder. After establishing themselves and prosperity was obtained, their desires for a "better” standard of living began establishing an institution that would supply their needs — the general store.

The opportunity to sell hard-to-find goods was met by individuals who many times became the richest residents in the community. In the general store, everything the customer wanted or needed could be supplied if the customer had enough money. Dry goods — clothes, cloth, hats, boots, shoes and sometimes exotic food — canned oysters, mushrooms, etc. became available as well as limited types of canned foods.

The proliferation of villages and small communities that spread out into the countryside increased the need for more of these small stores. More of these labor intensive stores sprung up not only in the core of the community but spread out into nearby neighborhoods. Many soon became specialized and sold only canned goods, farm produce, liquor, leather goods and meat products. Many aspects of these stores spelled trouble for them as the population increased and the automobile became a popular means of getting around. The merchandise in the store usually was doled out by a clerk who stood behind a counter, a very slow process. The goods available were limited and usually not marked with the price on it. Many goods, crackers, candy, etc. were not wrapped individually and had to be weighed and packaged. The number of customers who could be served was very limited due to the small number of family members available to wait upon the customer. All of these things took time and customers began looking for a quicker and cheaper way to shop and buy groceries.

Cost of products motivated the rise of the first supermarkets. Many attempts to cut the cost of food and household goods began in the larger cities in the 1800s.

Credit is given to Clarence Saunders of Memphis, Tenn. as the first developer of a self-service store. In 1916, Saunders named his stores Piggly Wiggly and provided check-out stands to cut the cost of help in his store. He also marked prices on every item and advertised his products and cost. His use of refrigerated cases encouraged frozen products and meat. His employees were dressed in uniforms. Saunders was so successful he franchised his stores and had 2,660 stores at the peak of his business.

After being founded by Bernard Kroger in 1883, the Kroger grocery stores in 1933 pioneered the first parking lot next to the store to accommodate the growing needs of the automobile public. Kroger’s had become the largest grocery store chain but only the second largest retailer by volume by the 2000s. In 2010, Wal-mart became the largest retailer in the United States.

The definition of a supermarket is: a business that offered self-service in separate product departments, discount pricing, marketing and volume selling. Research gives credit to a former Kroger employee, Michael J. Cullen, who on Aug. 4, 1930 opened in Jamaica, Queens, N.Y., the first King Kullen store in a 6,000-square-foot former garage. His slogan "Pile it high. Sell it low” made his store highly successful and when he died in 1936 he had 17 stores in business.

The increase in strip malls in the suburbs after World War II and the proliferation of the automobile spelled the doom for most of the mom-and-pop grocery stores. Parking lots became available and the prices of Safeway, Krogers, King Kullen, Piggly Wiggly, Purity Stores, etc. were too good to pass up. Further developments in marketing beginning in the 1960s saw the advent of the "big-box” stores. Discount retailers who relied on selling high volumes of merchandise such as Wal-mart which also predominately used non-union help began to become popular. Warehouse clubs like Costco sprung up throughout the communities and super stores increased competition that hurt the small stores.

Competition and success in the grocery business saw many upstarts come and go. Most small stores either went out of business or were absorbed by the larger, more aggressive chains. The Niven family established the Purity Grocery stores mainly along the West Coast in 1924. They occupied the unique Quonset Hut styled store on Broadway in Millbrae until 1977 when the company was liquidated. The site is now a Kinko’s/FedEx business and the only Purity store remaining is in Ft. Bragg, Calif.

The evolution to supply food and merchandise has resulted in the demise of many small entrepreneurs and much of the” personal touch” they offered has vanished except in very small communities. The return to the old way of life is a little more expensive but the satisfaction experienced has been lost.


During the preceding century, Stockton has seen many local, regional and national grocers come and go. The city was an early location for Piggly Wiggly and Safeway, while later there were Alpha-Beta,. Albertsons early California stores. Centro-Marts, Fry's and Lucky Stores also operated stores in Stockton

Stockton is where the Black's stores, Green Frog, Centromarts, Don Quick, Gaines, and a Save-Mart (a local chain with nothing to do with the Modesto Modesto, San Jose and Fresno Save-marts), originated. The stores listed below are all out of business, have become other markets or other type of use.

Click any thumbnail and it becomes a slideshow where you can then scroll through the slides. Or select Auto Play or use the mouse or keyboard arrow keys to scroll through all images

Former 88 Market - Waterloo Rd.   Click to EnlargeFormer 88 Market - Waterloo Rd. - Far right photo courtesy of Terry Gust
American Market Company - East Weber Avenue
Click to Enlarge A&L Market - 1005 North Yosemite - Former Blacks Market - 1940 - 1950
Former Albertsons / Food Bank / Today a Safeway - Lincoln Center South - 6435 Pacific Avenue
Former Albertsons / Food Bank - 1060 N. Wilson Way  - Now a Grocery Outlet
Former Alpha Beta - 1449 W. March Lane
Click to Enlarge Former Antoini's Market - 2202 E. Fremont Street
Click to Enlarge Bel Air Market - 230 E. Charter Way - Stetson's Market / Dicks Market / today a El Mercado
Click to Enlarge Former Berry's Market - 1148 S. San Joaquin Former Council for the Spanish Speaking (76) / Berry's Market / Habeeb Grocery (50)

Former Blacks Markets

Blacks No. 9 - 519 E. Charter Way<br>Click to Enlarge
No.9 - 519 E. Charter Way (1955) - Became Jacks Food
Blacks No. 1 - 01 N. El Dorado<br>Click to Enlarge
No.1 - 301 N. El Dorado - (1937) Became a Green Spot (1957)
Blacks No. 5 - 1212 E. Harding Way<br>  Click to Enlarge
No.5 - 1230 E. Harding Way. (1950)
106 Lincoln Center - Blacks No. 10<br> Click to Enlarge vspace=
No.10 - 106 Lincoln Center - Now Podesto's
1890's Blacks Family Grocery Store - Main & Center<br> Click to Enlarge vspace=
The original Blacks - Main & Center Streets
Former Blacks 1940-1950 - Don Quick Store in 1965 - 2209 East Main Street<br>  Click to Enlarge
No.4 - 2209 East Main Street (1940-1950) - Don Quicks, 1965 - Now a Church
Monte Diablo and Buena Vista. Blacks No. 8<br>  Click to Enlarge
No 8 - Monte Diablo and Buena Vista (1950s) Now a halfway house
2026 Pacific (1937) 2112 Pacific Avenue (1957) - Blacks No. 2<br>  Click to Enlarge
No 2 - 2112 Pacific, - Became a Gaines Market (1957)
2222 Pacific Avenue (1950)<br>  Click to Enlarge
No.10 - 2222 Pacific Avenue (1950)
Former Green Frog Emporium - 902 Waterloo Rd (1950) - Blacks No 7<br>  Click to Enlarge
No.7 - 902 Waterloo Rd. (1950) / Became Carpet Corner / Green Frog
S&L Market - 1005 North Yosemite - Former Blacks Market - 1940 - 1950<br>  Click to Enlarge
No.3 - 1005 N. Yosemite. - Now A&L Market

1890's Black's Family Grocery Store - Northeast corner Main & Center. Operated by Alexander and Houston Black. The family later operated grocery stores all over the Central Valley including stores in Fresno and Stockton.

Former Blacks Markets - - Blacks had six Stockton Markets in 1955;
No.1 - 301 N. El Dorado - (1937) Became a Green Spot (1957)
No 2 - 2112 Pacific, - Became a Gaines Market (1957)
No.3 - 1005 N. Yosemite. - Now A&L Market
No.4 - 2209 East Main Street (1940-1950) - Don Quicks, 1965 - Now a Church
No.5 - 1230 E. Harding Way. (1950)
No.6 - 528 East Weber - 1940-1950
No.7 - 902 Waterloo Rd. (1950) / Became Carpet Corner / Green Frog
No 8 - Monte Diablo and Buena Vista (1950s) Now a halfway house
No.9 - 519 E. Charter Way (1955) - Became Jacks Food
No.10 - 2222 Pacific Avenue (1950)
No.11 - 106 Lincoln Center - Now Podesto's

Fred Black lived at 806 S. Regent

Former Centromart Stores

Centromart 2150 West Alpine - Opened in the 1960s -  Click to Enlarge
2150 West Alpine - Opened in the 1960s Now a Dollar General Market
Former Street Car Barns - North California St -  Became Centromart in 1960 and in 1990 to Alpine Market<br>  Click to Enlarge
Former Street Car Barns. Became Centro-Mart in 1960 and in 1990 to Alpine Market - North California St.
Former Centro-Mart - 111 South Center (Today a Greyhound Bus Depot)<br>  Click to Enlarge
111 South Center - Demolished - Today, the Greyhound Bus Depot location - Ron Chapman photo
Former Centro-Mart - 111 South Center - Demolished<br>  Click to Enlarge
111 South Center - Demolished - Today, the Greyhound Bus Depot location - Ron Chapman photo
Former Safeway / Centromart - Now a Dollar General Market - 310 W. Charter Way<br>  Click to Enlarge
310 W. Charter Way - Former Safeway - Now a Dollar General Market
Former Centromart - Now a Church 2222 Lever Blvd<br>  Click to Enlarge
Former Centromart - Now a Church 2222 Lever Blvd
Former Centromart - Now a Church 2222 Lever Blvd<br>  Click to Enlarge
Former Centromart - Now a Church 2222 Lever Blvd - Ron Chapman photo
Former Centromart Former Food Fair Market - Demolished - Today a Food-4-Less is on this location - 7920 Lower Sacramento Rd. - Floyd Perry Jr. photo<br>  Click to Enlarge
Centromart - 7920 Lower Sacramento Rd. - Floyd Perry Jr. photo
Closed Centromart 4232 East Main St.<br>  Click to Enlarge
4232 East Main St.  - Now a Dollar General Market
Former Centromart 6112 Pacific Avenue<br>  Click to Enlarge
6112 Pacific Avenue - Centro-Mart #2 - Became a Carpet Store - Now a thrift store
Former Centromart - 2907 Waterloo Rd.<br>  Click to Enlarge
Former Centromart - 2907 Waterloo Rd. Ron Chapman photo
Former Centro-Mart Warehouse - 445 W. Weber<br>  Click to Enlarge
445 W. Weber - Former Centro-Mart Warehouse
Former New Country Market / Centromart - 1800 N. Wilson Way - Floyd Perry Jr. photo<br>  Click to Enlarge
1800 N. Wilson Way and Bradford / Former Country Store/ Rolla-torium Skating Rink  - Floyd Perry Jr. photo
Click to Enlarge
Centromart Logo

Centro Mart - CEO Mel Young says the Stockton-based chain,which until his death earlier in January was run for decades by veteran California grocer Jimmy Lam will keep two stores, a Centro Mart banner grocery store in the East Bay Area city of Oakley and a supermarket it operates under the Apple Marketplace banner in Lodi, which is near Stockton. Dollar General has leased the five Centro Mart stores. Its not acquiring Centro Mart. Centro-Mart stores were located at Alpine, Charter Way, East Main Street and Waterloo Rd. Previous Centro-Mart Stores were on Wilson Way, Hammer Lane, South Center, Lever Blvd and Pacific Avenue.

I ran across an article in an Oakley newspaper showing the Centro-Mart there was formerly a Daylite Market. The 1945 Stockton City shows two Daylite Markets in Stockton, but no Centro-Marts. One at 107 S. Center (Today a Greyhound Bus Depot) where the Centro-Mart was located in 1955 and another at 105 S. California St. (now a parking garage)

Former Street Car Barns. Became Centro-Mart in 1960 and in 1990 to Alpine Market - North California St. Today it's the Alpine Market

2150 West Alpine - Opened in the 1960s Now a Dollar General Market

111 South Center - Demolished - Today, it's the Greyhound Bus Depot location.

310 W. Charter Way - Former Safeway - Now a Dollar General Market 

4232 East Main St.  - Now a Dollar General Market

Pacific Avenue - Centro-Mart #2 - Became a Carpet Store

2907 Waterloo Rd. - Now a Dollar General Market

445 W. Weber - Centro-Mart Warehouse

1800 N. Wilson Way and Bradford / Former Country Store/ Rolla-torium Skating Rink

Click to Enlarge Cox's Grocery - 639 S. Hinkley - 1967
Click to Enlarge Curnow Brothers Grocery Meats and Bakery at 445 N. San Joaquin and Fremont.

Former Don Quick Stores

Former Don Quick Market - Benjamin Holt - Now Marina Market</b> <b>Place- In Lincoln Village West - Floyd Perry Jr. photo<br>  Click to Enlarge
 Benjamin Holt Now Marina Market Place- In Lincoln Village West  - Floyd Perry Jr. photo
Today it's Podesto's - Former Blacks, Gaines Market, Don Quicks. <br>  Click to Enlarge
Lincoln Center - Former Blacks, Gaines, Don Quicks and now, Podesto's
Former Don Quick's (1970-84) - Gaines Market from 1955-1970 - 4115 N. El Dorado St. - Dollar General Market <br>  Click to Enlarge
4115 N. El Dorado St. - Floyd Perry Jr. photo. See comments below
Former Don Quick Market - 8626 Lower Sacramento Rd. - Today A Super King Market<brClick to Enlarge
8626 Lower Sacramento Rd. - Today A Super King Market
Former Don Quick Market - 2209 E. Main St<brClick to Enlarge
2209 E. Main St. Also a former Blacks store
Don Quick / Safeway / Consumers Discount / Grand Save and others at 2481 E. Main and Filbert Streets. Today a Super Mercado - <brClick to Enlarge
Don Quick / Safeway / Consumers Discount / Grand Save and others. 2481 E. Main and Filbert Streets. Today a Super Mercado
Mt. Diablo and Buena Vista<brClick to Enlarge
Once was the Green Frog Emporium / Blacks / Don Quick before moving next door just to the west
Former Don Quick Market at 1832 Monte Diablo Ave. This location was sold in 1983. Today it is Big Valley Foods.<br>  Click to Enlarge
1832 Monte Diablo Ave. This location was sold in 1983. Today it is Big Valley Foods
Former Don Quick Market - 2222 Pacific Ave<br>  Click to Enlarge
2222 Pacific Avenue - Also a former Blacks Market
Former Don Quick Market at 2725 Waterloo Rd - Don Quicks Market was there from 1946 to 1983. Another market operated there for a year before Joe Lents Carpets moved there in 1985. Now occupied by Victory Outreach Church of Stockton.<brClick to Enlarge
No. 1 - 2725 Waterloo Rd - Don Quicks Market was there from 1946 to 1983
Former Don Quick Market (mid 1950s) - 1605 West Washington St <brClick to Enlarge
Former Don Quicks (mid 1950s) - 1605 West Washington St

Founded by Max Podesto in 1949 at 2725 Waterloo Road. They eventually had a local chain of 10 markets in Stockton and 1 each in Rio Vista, Oakdale, Tracy and Sonora. Former Markets include: 1, Waterloo Rd, 2. Benjamin Holt, 3, Monte Diablo, 4&5. East Main Street, 6. Pacific Avenue, 7. North El Dorado, 8, West Weber, 9. Lincoln Center, and 10. Lower Sacramento Rd. The last Don Quick closed in Stockton in 1990. The actual last Don Quick was sold in 1991, the Rio Vista location

Former Don Quick Market - Once was the Green Frog Emporium / Blacks / Don Quick before moving next door just to the west where Big Valley Food is Now The Alamo Club - Corner of Mt. Diablo and Buena Vista

Former Don Quick Market - Benjamin Holt Now Marina Market Place- In Lincoln Village West

4115 N. El Dorado St. - Dollar General Market - The list is getting longer; Former Gaines Market (1955-1970)(Floyd Perry Jr. photo), Don Quick's (1970-84), Ye Olde Market (1984-93), Hampton & Podesta Market (1993-97), Health Care Supply Store (1997-04), American Home Furnishings (2005-12), Dollar General Store (2012-

Former Don Quick Market - 8626 Lower Sacramento Rd. - Today A Super King Market

Former Don Quick Market - 2209 E. Main St.

Don Quick / Safeway / Consumers Discount / Grand Save and others at 2481 E. Main and Filbert Streets. Today a Super Mercado -

Former Don Quick Market at 1832 Monte Diablo Ave. This location was sold in 1983. Today it is Big Valley Foods.

Former Don Quick Market - 2222 Pacific Avenue

Former Don Quick Market at 2725 Waterloo Rd - Don Quicks Market was there from 1946 to 1983. Another market operated there for a year before Joe Lents Carpets moved there in 1985. Now occupied by Victory Outreach Church of Stockton. They been around for some time, but with the recent rise of violence, they have decided to take their message of peace and literally blast it into the streets so people have no choice but to listen to what they have to say.

Former Don Quick Market (mid 1950s) - 1605 West Washington St
Click to Enlarge 2163 S. San Joaquin - El Amigo Market / Mabel's Market (76) Southside Market (57)/ JD Ferarro Grocery (50)
Click to Enlarge Former El Ricardo Market SE corner of Flora and D Streets
Click to Enlarge Gaia Delucchi Delicatessen & Grocery Store - 140 North American Street - The Gaia Delucchi Delicatessen was originally located on Market Street. The business was moved to the N. American Street location in the late 1920s. Stockton City Directories list A. J. Gault Auto as an occupant of 140 N. ·American by 1935and through 1945. Gaia Delucchi Co. is listed as the sole occupant by 1950. It was example of an industrial architecture influenced by the Art Deco Style. The Delucchi family was well-known in Stockton, and famous for their Italian foods. - The building was demolished. Today it's just a vacant lot
Click to Enlarge Former Food Fair Market - 2053 E. Mariposa Rd. - Today a Big Value Market
Click to Enlarge Former Fry's Market - 3233 Hammer Lane - Fry's started out in the San Francisco Bay area, and spread into Arizona and Nevada They were acquired by Kroger during the 1980s. The Northern California stores were sold to Save-Mart in 1989. Other stores remain in operation. Fry’s Electronics stores were part of the same family and use a similar logo, although are otherwise unrelated.

Gaines Market

Former Gaines Markets

2244 Airport Way - Former Gaines Market - Ron Chapman Photo -   Click to Enlarge
Former Gaines Market - 2244 Airport Way - Ron Chapman photo
Former Gaines Market - 3314 Delaware - Click to Enlarge
Former Gaines Market - 3314 Delaware, corner of Alpine - Now a Dance Studio - Photo by Floyd Perry Jr
Former Gaines Market from 1955-1970 - 4115 North El Dorado St. - Photo by Kevin Gaines<br>  Click to Enlarge
Gaines Market from 1955-1970, Don Quick Market in 1975 - 4115 North El Dorado Street - Kevin Gaines photo
Former Gaines Market - 110 S. Filbert - Thanks to Floyd Perry Jr <brClick to Enlarge
Former Gaines Market - 110 N. Filbert St - Thanks to Floyd Perry jr.
Former Gaines Market - Mayfair Center - 6045 N. El Dorado - Photo by Kevin Gaines<br>  Click to Enlarge
Former Gaines Market - 6045 North  El Dorado St - Mayfair Shopping Center -   Kevin Gaines photo
First Gaines Market - 1563 E. Fremont - Photo by Kevin Gaines<br>  Click to Enlarge
First Gaines Market - 1563 E. Fremont - Building now occupied by Angelina's - Kevin Gaines photo
Former Gaines Market - Lincoln Center - Photo by Kevin Gaines<br>  Click to Enlarge
Former Gaines Market - 106 Lincoln Center - Photo by Kevin Gaines
Former Gaines Market - 1950s Parade 2112 Pacific Avenue<br>  Click to Enlarge
Former Gaines Market - 2112 Pacific Avenue  - Also a former Blacks Market

Former Gaines Market - 3314 Delaware, corner of Alpine - Now a Dance Studio - Photo by Floyd Perry Jr

Former Gaines Market from 1955-1970, Don Quick Market in 1975 before it became a Furniture store - 4115 North El Dorado Street - Today, it's Dollar General Market

Former Gaines Market - 6045 North  El Dorado St - Mayfair Shopping Center

Former Gaines Market - 110 N. Filbert St.

First Gaines Market - 1563 E. Fremont St / Today Angelina's Spaghetti House

Former Gaines Market - 106 Lincoln Center - Photo by Kevin Gaines

Former Gaines Market - 2112 Pacific Avenue
Click to Enlarge Former Giant Food Market - Later a Centromart. Waterloo Rd. Today A Dollar General Store

Green Frog

Click to Enlarge Former Green Frog - 523 E. Charter Way same as Jacks's Food 519 E. Charter Way
Click to Enlarge Former Green Frog - Blacks / Green Spot - 301 N. El Dorado St. Demolished
Click to Enlarge Former Green Frog Food Emporium - 1930-1970 - 902 Waterloo Rd - Now a Restaurant - Photo by Ron Chapman
Click to Enlarge Former Green Frog Food Emporium - 701 East Weber  9145 - 1950 - Green Spot Food. then Felix & Betty's Italian Restaurant
Click to Enlarge Former Green Frog / Blacks / Now small shops - 2222 Pacific Avenue
Click to Enlarge Former Green Spot Market - 1910 Country Club - Later a Radio Shack Store - Today Casagrandes Delicatessen & Catering
Click to Enlarge Former G&G Market - 2301 E. Vine St 
Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Hammond and Yardley Groceries - 223 East Weber Avenue- The building was part of the Hammond and Yardley Grocery Store, once two stories tall. The 1895 and 1917 Stockton Sanborn Maps reveal that there was once a two-story building on this site, but by the time the 1950 map was drawn, a one-story building was present. The Stockton City Directory listed the building as the Pleasanton House by 1912 and through 1925. By 1930, the building was listed as the Skaggs Safeway Stores and the Bradford Hotel. By 1940, it had been converted into F. L. Williams. Real Estate and State Building and Loan, and in 1945, the Stockton Realty Board, State Savings & Loan Association and Williams Real. Estate were all located here. In the 1960s, the facade and interior were altered to accommodate a thrift shop. Photographs reveal a metal or wood panel placed over the upper portion of the facade, and a large display window in each of the two narrow bays. The screen has since been removed, and the facade remodeled to an Art Deco style.
Click to Enlarge J.N. Harrison & Sons Grocery - 135 N. California St. 1915. Today, part of the RTD block
Click to Enlarge Click to EnlargeHart & Thrift Grocery. 401-407 East Weber Avenue. The building's original owners, John Hart and E.E. Thrift, were two of Stockton's commercial pioneers and regarded as highly respected gentlemen. Their grocery store carried a "choice lot of groceries and provisions." - Today, it's part of the RTD Block
Click to EnlargeHi & Bye Market 505 W. Harding Way - former Segarini's 
Click to EnlargeFormer Jack's Food Center - 519 E. Charter Way 
Jewel Tea - 738 E. Market St - The former Goodwill Building
Click to EnlargeJones Hewlitt Groceries - 1860
Click to Enlarge King's Market - 1749 S. California St. / Today Salam Market
King's Market - 2654 E. Main St. / Today Realty World Dave Thurman
Click to Enlarge Knutzen and Ewertsen, Grocers. This building at 704 East Lindsay has housed various businesses and residents since its beginning. By 1930, Knutzen and Ewertsen, grocers, and Jasper Ksinner, miller were listed here, along with H. L. Nickerson, Mrs. Emma Lee. and Sarah Bennett The grocery store remained in this location through 1950, though the name changed to Migraoco Grocery by 1945. By 1950, The Canteen, a vending machine company, occupied the store front at 708 E. Lindsay.
Lucky Stores was founded by Charles Crouch as Peninsula Stores Limited in 1931 with the acquisition of Piggly Wiggly stores in Burlingame, San Mateo, Redwood City, Palo Alto and San Jose. By 1935, seven more stores had been added, including the company's first stores in the East Bay, in Berkeley and Oakland.

Lucky had a big influence in transitioning from small store to supermarket.

Its first flagship store opened in 1947 in San Leandro, California. It featured a coffee shop and other conveniences. Also known as "Lucky #50", this store was managed for years by San Leandro native Anthony (Tony) Minniti. the years, it remained a highly profitable store during his tenure. After his retirement, the store's customer base (and profitability) declined over time. It was the last Lucky Store to be re-branded after the takeover by Albertsons. Due to dwindling profits, it later closed in 2005

By 1988, Lucky became a part of American Stores Company, along with Jewel-Osco, Acme Markets, Alpha Beta, Buttrey Food & Drug, Osco Drug, Sav-on Drugs, and Star Market. The Alpha Beta stores in Northern California became Lucky Stores. A number of Southern California branches were sold to Ralphs. Some Lucky Stores with combined food and drug changed their name to Lucky-Sav-on as part of the merger.

In 1998, American Stores was bought out by Albertsons, which became briefly the largest grocery retailer in the United States, but became second after Kroger acquired Fred Meyer the following month. In the year that followed, all Lucky Stores took the Albertsons name, and the Lucky brand was phased out, in order to not create confusion. In Central California, many Lucky Stores were bought by Save Mart Supermarkets and now operate as Save Mart using the S-Mart name as there was already a Save Mart name being used in Stockton and Lodi.

Click to Enlarge Former Lucky Store - Pacific & Alpine
Click to Enlarge Former Lucky's Milk & Ice Cream - 530 E. Charter Way
Click to Enlarge Mac Disco - 110 N. Filbert. Thanks to Floyd Perry Jr.
Click to Enlarge Mac Disco Wonderworld - 2542 S. El Dorado Street
Click to Enlarge Former March's Market - 47 West Harding Way. Today it's March's Liquors
1601 S. Sutter Marks Grocery (1967) - 1601 S. Sutter
Click to Enlarge Martha Washington Grocery Stores - 522 East Weber - By 1923 there were 56 Martha Washington Stores in California. The chain disappeared by 1928 - The building still stands today
Click to EnlargeFormer Morada Market - I knew Silva and Ernie Canepa when they owned the Morada Market, however they sold the market in 2004 to a Fresno family and as often happens the new owners just didn't have the same relationship with the customers
Click to Enlarge Former New Deal Market - 2015 E. Mariposa Rd - Today Don Juan foods
Click to Enlarge Former Oak Market Grocery - 947 S. San Joaquin
Click to Enlarge Former Oak Park Market - E. Alpine
Click to Enlarge Click to EnlargeP&J Market - 1608 S. Adelbert 
Click to Enlarge Payless Supermarket - 6435 Pacific Avenue in Lincoln Center South. Payless subsequently sold their supermarket chain to Albertson's. Albertsons later sold their Northern California stores to Save-Mart of Modesto. They could not use the Save-Mart name in Stockton, so the stores were named S-mart. A Safeway store is at this location today - Floyd Perry Jr. Photo

Former Piggly Wiggly Markets

30 E. Acacia - Click to Enlarge
Former Piggly Wiggly Market -46 W. Acacia Street
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 1400 S. California St. Today it's Deportes Holanda / Former Normans Auto Supply / Green Frog Food Emporium (1942-43)and Piggly Wiggly before that <br>   Click to Enlarge
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 1400 S. California Street
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 1304 N. El Dorado and Vine - A 1933 Photo of the Piggly Wiggly Store at El Dorado and Vine Streets. They called it Store 600 - Many of the old Safeway stores around were former Piggly Wiggly Stores<br>  Click to Enlarge
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 1304 N. El Dorado Street
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 1802 S. El Dorado St. At 4th Street <br>   Click to Enlarge
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 1802 S. El Dorado Street
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 2153 E. Main <br>   Click to Enlarge
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 2153 E. Main
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 323 E. Market Street <br>   Click to Enlarge
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 323 E. Market Street
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 1910 Pacific Avenue /  Oris's Bakery (1942)<br>   Click to Enlarge
Former Piggly Wiggly Market -1910 Pacific Avenue
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 1910 Pacific Avenue  /  Oris's Bakery (1942)<br>   Click to Enlarge
Former Piggly Wiggly Market -1910 Pacific Avenue
Former Piggly Wiggly Market 1930 - - 1 S. Wilson Way former Safeway 1935 <br>   Click to Enlarge
Former Piggly Wiggly Market -1 S. Wilson Way
Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 914 North Wilson Way - Now a Restaurant <br>   Click to Enlarge
Former Piggly Wiggly Market -914 North Wilson Way
445-447 East Weber - built in 1921 - The Delta Building was opened in November of 1921 for the Piggly Wiggly organization as a grocery store. By 1928, City Directories listed the Majestic Meat Market and B. Somers Delicatessen along with the Piggly Wiggly. By 1930, there was no listing for the building. In 1935, the City Directory listed a labor temple at 443, but 445 was vacant. By 1940, 443 was called the Progressive Building, and Hansen Carter Stationary was located at 447. The 1945 Directory listed the addition of a Singer Sewing Machine shop at 445. By 1950, it had become the Corset Shop, and 447 was listed as Hansen Printers and Scott Stationary. In the late 1970s, 445 was the Peniel Gospel Lighthouse<br>   Click to Enlarge
 Former Piggly Wiggly Market - 445-447 East Weber

Former Piggly Wiggly Markets - In 1928 - Safeway acquired Piggly Wiggly of The Pacific which included 91 stores (including 7 Stockton Stores) Most of these stores continued to operate under the Piggly Wiggly name for several years. These stores included: 1400 S. California Street, 46 W. Acacia Street, 1304 N. El Dorado Street, 1802 S. El Dorado Street, 323 E. Market Street, 1910 Pacific Avenue, 914 North Wilson Way, 445-447 East Weber

Click to Enlarge Former Quick Stop Market - 1414 E. Harding Way - Tire & Wheel Pros
Click to Enlarge Former Redwood Market - 1319 East Harding Way - Next door to former Dicks Drive In - And the building was Redwood Color at one time and it also had a wood shake roof - It looked much better back then

Former Safeway Stores

Former Safeway / Centromart - 310 W. Charter Way<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Safeway /Centro-Mart - Charter Way - Now a Dollar General Market
Former Safeway 349 East Charter Way<br>Click to Enlarge 
Former Safeway - 1930-1950 - 348 East Charter Way - Today a hair Salon 
Former Safeway - 2720 Country Club, now a Big Lots - Floyd Perry Jr. Photo<br>Click to Enlarge
2720 Country Club - Now a Big Lots. Safeway moved next door at 2808 Country Club - Floyd Perry jr. photo
Former Safeway - 2208 E. Main<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Skaggs Safeway Store - 1925-1950 - 2208 E. Main St - Casa Mexicana Panaderia / Former D&F Marke
Former Safeway 600 North El Dorado Street<br>Click to Enlarge
Safeway - 1940-1950 - 600 N. El Dorado St - Today an Auto Supply Store
Super Mercado - Former Safeway / Don Quicks and others at Main and Filbert Streets<br>Click to Enlarge
Don Quick / Safeway / Consumers Discount / Grand Save and others. 2481 E. Main  Today a Super Mercado
Former Safeway - 1861 Pacific Avenue<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Safeway - 1940-1955 - 1861 Pacific Avenue - Miracle Mile
Former Safeway / Woodbridge Realty - 1902 Pacific Avenue<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Safeway - 1902 Pacific Avenue - 1930-35 before they moved across the street
Former Safeway - 340 North Wilson Way<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Safeway - 6632 Pacific Avenue - Michaels  - Demolished and Now a CVS - Floyd Perry Jr. photo
Former Safeway - 223 E. Weber Ave.<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Safeway - 233 East Weber - 1930s
Former Safeway - 630 East Weber Avenue<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Safeway - 1940-1955 - 630 East Weber - Today a church
Former Safeway - 340 North Wilson Way<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Safeway - 340 North Wilson Way - Now a tire store
Former Safeway - 1 S. Wilson Way<br>Click to Enlarge
Safeway - 1935 - Piggly-Wiggly 1930 - 1 South Wilson Way
Former Safeway, 948 North Yosemite - 1930 - 1940<br>Click to Enlarge
 Former Safeway, 948 North Yosemite - 1930 - 1940 - Now a Restaurant

Former Safeway /Centro-Mart - Charter Way - Now a Dollar General Market

Former Safeway - 1930-1950 - 348 East Charter Way - Today a hair Salon

Former Safeway - 2720 Country Club - Now a Big Lots. Safeway has a new building next door at 2808 Country Club - Safeway opened this store when they closed the 2481 E. East Main Store

Safeway - 1940-1950 - 600 N. El Dorado St - Today an Auto Supply Store

Former Skaggs Safeway Store - 1925-1950 - 2208 E. Main St - Casa Mexicana Panaderia / Former D&F Market

Former Safeway - 6632 Pacific Avenue - Michaels Arts & Crafts - Demolished and Now a CVS Pharmacy

Former Safeway - 1902 Pacific Avenue - 1930-35 before they moved across the street to the building TAP plastic is in at 1861 Pacific 1940-1955 - Today, the Stockton Art League

Former Safeway - 1940-1955 - 1861 Pacific Avenue - Miracle Mile

Former Safeway - 233 East Weber - 1930s

Former Safeway - 1940-1955 - 630 East Weber - Today a church

Former Skaggs Cash Store,  702-706 East Weber Avenue, 1930 -Skaggs Safeway, 1935 just Safeway, 1945-1970 Western Auto

Former Safeway - 340 North Wilson Way - Check out that 1956 Chrysler in the back - Photo date is Apr 29, 2012 - Now a tire store

Safeway - 1935 - Piggly-Wiggly 1930 - 1 South Wilson Way

Former Safeway - 201 South Wilson Way - 1930-1945 - Now Crosstown Freeway

 Former Safeway, 948 North Yosemite - 1930 - 1940 - Now a Restaurant

San Joaquin Market - 502 S. San  Joaquin
Click to Enlarge Click to EnlargeFormer S&G Market / Former 99 Market - Today A El Mercado Mexican Market - S&G stood for Steve & Gus- This is a mom and pop market in South Stockton, not the nicest neighborhood. This picture was taken in 2004. It is now a Mexican Market called SUPER MERCADO LA AMAPOLA #2. It is located at 1900 South El Dorado Street near Edison High School.
Click to Enlarge Click to EnlargeClosed - S-Mart - 3733 W. Hammer Lane - Hammer Lane and Kelly Drive - Former Fry's - Right photo date 05/25/13
Click to Enlarge Closed - S-Mart / Frys / John's Pizza - Pershing and March Lane
Click to Enlarge Former S-Mart / Albertsons - 1060 N. Wilson Way  - Now a Grocery Outlet
Click to Enlarge Closed Save-Mart - 3310 East Main Street
Click to Enlarge Former Save Mart - 1536 Waterloo Road and D Street. Today a Superior Super Mercardo
Click to Enlarge Former Save-Mor Market - 2571 McKinley

Former Segarini's Markets

Grand Save Market - Former Segarinis Market 2318 S. Airport Way<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Segarini's Market.  - 2318 South Airport Way - Today a Grand Save Market
Former Segarinis Market - Country Club and Pershing<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Segarini's Market - Country Club and Pershing
Former Segarinis Market - El Dorado & Castle<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Segarini's Market - Segarinis Market was in this location at 2320 North El Dorado between Adams and Hampton
Former Segarinis Market - 505 W. Harding Way - Ron Chapman photo<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Segarini's Market / Hi-Bye 505 West Harding Way - Burned to the ground and demolished - Photo by Ron Chapman
Former Segarinis Market - Hammer Lane and Thornton Rd - Gary Pardini photo<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Segarini's Market - 7943 Thornton Rd. Later The Toy Box - Hammer Lane and Thornton Rd - Now a Furniture Store
Former Segarinis Market - Hammer Lane and Thornton Rd<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Segarini's Market - 7943 Thornton Rd. Later The Toy Box - Hammer Lane and Thornton Rd - Now a Furniture Store

Former Segarini's Market - Country Club and Pershing

Former Segarini's Market - Segarinis Market was in this location at 2320 North El Dorado between Adams and Hampton. Now The Shell El Dorado Food Market

Former Segarini's Market - 7943 Thornton Rd. Later The Toy Box - Hammer Lane and Thornton Rd - Now a Furniture Store

Former Segarini's Market / Hi-Bye 505 West Harding Way - Burned to the ground and demolished - Photo by Ron Chapman

Former Segarini's Market.  - 2318 South Airport Way - Today a Grand Save Market

Former Sibs's Markets

Former Sibs Market / Gaines Market</b> - 3314 Delaware, corner of Alpine - Now a Dance Studio<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Sibs Market / Gaines Market - 3314 Delaware, corner of Alpine - Now a Dance Studio
Former Sibs Market - 1740 W. Hammer Lane - Floyd Perry Jr. photo<br>Click to Enlarge
Former Sibs Market - Hammer Lane - Floyd Perry jr. photo
Former Sibs Market - 10038 N. Highway 99- Floyd Perry Jr. photo, Click to Enlarge
Former Sibs Market - 10038 N. Highway 99" - Photo by Floyd Perry Jr.
Former Sibs Market - 301 S. Wilson Way - Floyd Perry Jr. photo, Click to Enlarge
Former Sibs Market - 301 S. Wilson Way

Former Sibs Market / Gaines Market - 3314 Delaware, corner of Alpine - Now a Dance Studio

Former Sibs Market - Hammer Lane

Former Sibs Market - 10038 North Highway 99

Former Sibs Market - 301 S. Wilson Way

Click to EnlargeTony's Market - 947 S. California
Click to Enlarge Village Oaks Market -6225 Harrisburg Place - The original owner was Roy Delucchi. Roy sold the market to Joe Corina in the early 1980's. And around 1989, I think, it was sold to Kiyoshi Morodoni, who also owned Oak Park Market & Alpine Market (when the latter was located at Alpine and Delaware). They owned it until around 1992
Click to Enlarge Vina Super Market  - Next to K-mart on Pacific Avenue - Photo by Floyd Perry Jr.
Click to Enlarge Former Wilshire Market - 2225 Monte Diablo - Today a Kelly Moore Paint Store

Suggested Books Related to Stockton

k Shop America: Mid-Century Storefront Design, 1938-1950 - American postwar window shopping, once it all was pointing to a bright and shiny future. Pure optimism and opulence influenced everything from architecture to automobile design, infusing design with bigger-than-life curves and planes. Storefront designs of that bygone era is indicative of a phenomenon, depicted here in a vast collection of shop window designs beautifully hand illustrations from 1938 thru 1950. There are spectacular, typically grandiose layouts for grocery stores, beauty salons, bakeries, shoe shops, and more reminding one of a period when shops and stores were once sacred shrines for American shoppers to congregate! Impressive and ever so slightly intimidating, just as the future itself. Acquired for this one of a kind book, the collections when seen in retrospect show the mindset of the people in a special period in American history. Additionally there are historic black and white pictures of actual shops fashioned in a similar design. Shop America provides a rare glimpse at a commercial mid-century America.
Stockton Article Index
Stockton Grocers of Today

We are looking for more old Stockton grocery store photos - Please post them on our Memories of Stockton Facebook Group

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